Well of course there’s an Apple Tax!

CNet Interviewed Brad Brooks, and in that interview he says that Mac buyers pay an “Apple Tax”

DUH

Apple owners have long known about the Apple Tax, we joke about, nothing new Brad! He seems to think we (Apple product owners) think that Apple really pays 500 dollars to build each 16gb iPhone, and 2500 dollars for each Mac Pro. We don’t!

You’re not going to get things like Microsoft Outlook, you’re not going to get the games that you’re used to playing. There’s a technology tax–Apple still doesn’t have HDMI, doesn’t have Blu-ray offerings, doesn’t have e-SATA external disk drives that work at twice the speed of FireWire. And so you’ve got all of these things that are truly taxes.

We don’t want Outlook Brad, It’s a crappy app. He seems to attribute a lack of choice, to being a lack of choice in M$ apps. That’s hardly the case. Aside of a good SQL Server client, there’s nothing I miss from my PC days. Entourage is as crappy as outlook, so nothing there. Mail.app suffices, but hello, Gmail with IMAP anyone? Why have a landlocked desktop mail client? Sure it’d be nice to have blue ray options, but mmm not a deal breaker. I mean when I travel I’ve got iTouch, iPhone, and iTunes to watch video in, why waste Battery spinning a drive to watch a movie? e-SATA? what for? THere’s plenty of Firewire and USB options, why have one more? One more port to get gunk in it, one more thing to buy to keep up with the ever changing PC landscape.

Brooks: You know, I think it’s a good point. I think the question is, though, do customers really know what they’re getting into? I don’t personally believe that customers really know that a copy of Parallels is going to cost them $80, or that when they really look at what they’re going to have to pay in terms of another $200 for a (full boxed copy of Windows), that they’re going to pay for another $149 for MobileMe to put on there, Internet services, which they can basically get all the same functionality when they have Windows and Windows Live working together.

Brooks also thinks consumers are stupid. I’m not sure what Windows Live is, but Mobile Me is optional and a vast majority don’t use it. I do, because I have three macs and want my data all in one place. There’s cheaper options, but Mobile Me is baked in so the integration is nice.

Those who need VMware or Parallels, etc need Windowz for work for the most part, so the casual Mac owner, won’t ever pay that “Tax”. Every Mac buyer doesn’t buy a copy of VMware or Parallels, most are looking to leave Windows behind and not look back.

A funny statement:

Just the fact that we’re having this long of a conversation about Apple, it seems to reflect a shift in Microsoft’s thinking that Apple is more of a threat on the PC side. I mean, how do you guys view Apple in terms of a competitive threat on the desktop?
Brooks: The conversations that we’re having really started back around our partner conference in early July. And I came out and said, right there onstage in front of tens of thousands of partners, “we’re drawing a line in the sand.”

A line that many are running as fast as they can right up to, stepping over, and never looking back.

I won’t keep posting tidbits, of M$ non sense, read the entire article.  I want to get back to my point. Yes there’s an Apple Tax. I paid it when I bought my Macbook Pro, that is now three years old and not likely to be replaced any time soon. Where as my wife’s Inspiron is in dire need of either a re install from all the Crapware (wait, crapware on a PC? No way according to Brad, oh wait, she’s XP), or just a new machine. My iPod Photo, still running, the Apple Tax I paid nearly 7 years ago, well earned in my opintion. I wonder if a Zune will last that long…?

However to insinuate there’s no Windows Tax is just plain silly. Sure it’s not paid on the hardware Windows runs on, that’d be the Dell Tax. It’s paid in time lost rebooting, waiting for outlook to load, waiting for the wireless network to figure itself out and get working, waiting for the newest 20+ software updates to download. It’s also paid in having to run Anti Virus software, having to re install the OS every 6 months to a year just to get some performance. For Vista users, it’s my understanding (thanks to Tom) that it’s paid in waiting for it to reboot after you put it to sleep or changed wireless networks.

There’s a Windows Tax, to be sure, to say otherwise is plain disengenuous. Brad is no doubt your typical mud slinging marketing wonk, but really, CNN why waste time even talking to him? Especially when it’s clear he thinks the reason Apple is doing so well is that consumers are stupid and un aware of the choices they’re making. Brad, I hate to break it to you, but we know, and we’re ok with it.

And it is not a question of whether they are satisfied or dissatisfied with the experience, it’s a question of whether they really know what they’re getting into when they choose to embark upon that path.

To close another funny. Brad might not be the best person for interviews since even Ina picked up on it.

Is there risk in the way you guys are doing this that some of the messaging sounds like “you, the consumer, just don’t get it?”
Brooks: That’s far from the message that I want to deliver.

Bummer Brad, that’s the message you did deliver.

7 thoughts on “Well of course there’s an Apple Tax!

  1. Dan Skaggs Post author

    I read that article a couple days ago and had to stop mid-way through because the crap he was spewing was severely ticking me off. Sounds to me like a MS flunky (albeit a highly-paid MS flunky if he’s a VP) trying to make his OS look better by painting only a part of the picture of the competition. Our household ran across that line in the sand last year and I’m absolutely glad we did.

  2. Jake Munson Post author

    At the top of your post you said this was a CNN article. I had read a similar article on cnet a couple of days ago, so I figured Microsoft was making the rounds with this propaganda. However, then I saw that one of the interview quotes you pasted contained a question from the interviewer that was the same question as the cnet interview. Then I noticed that the article really was the same article that I read, and that you meant to say cnet instead of cnn. :)

  3. Jeffry Houser Post author

    I saw the same article and thought it pointless at best. Yes, if you switch from PC to Mac you may have to get new / different software. What that constitutes news is beyond me.

    Beyond that, I use a desktop mail client. I believe all web mail clients suck (that includes gmail and Yahoo mail which are the ones I am most familiar with ).

    I'm no expert on the subject, but I thought there were some privacy concerns regarding gmail. If memory serves me the gist is that Google keeps copies of everything even if you delete it. The Communication Decency Act makes all e-mail "non-private" after 3 months. If push comes to shove, Google has a personal searchable, easily subpoena-able database on you

  4. John Wilker Post author

    @Jake,

    LOL You’re right. I’ll fix that!

    @Dan,

    yup I hear you. He was definitely engaging in FUD (i think it’s called) with little fact or actual information to back it.

    @Jeff

    good points. yes using a desktop keeps your data more in your hands. Who knows to what end google puts it. As a test that they’re reading. Have some one email a gmail account with the body of "Grandma passed away yesterday" or something. Gmail won’t serve ads in that message. They read ’em for sure.

    My beef with desktop apps (and I use mail.app for EUI mail) is that if I want to get it at an internet cafe, or from my wife’s computer etc. Either I can’t or I have to use a really crappy webmail version of exchange.

    I do keep all of my anti goverment plotting strictly to my anonymized email, just in case, LOL

  5. John Wilker

    @Jake,

    LOL You're right. I'll fix that!

    @Dan,

    yup I hear you. He was definitely engaging in FUD (i think it's called) with little fact or actual information to back it.

    @Jeff

    good points. yes using a desktop keeps your data more in your hands. Who knows to what end google puts it. As a test that they're reading. Have some one email a gmail account with the body of "Grandma passed away yesterday" or something. Gmail won't serve ads in that message. They read 'em for sure.

    My beef with desktop apps (and I use mail.app for EUI mail) is that if I want to get it at an internet cafe, or from my wife's computer etc. Either I can't or I have to use a really crappy webmail version of exchange.

    I do keep all of my anti goverment plotting strictly to my anonymized email, just in case, LOL

  6. Jeffry Houser

    I saw the same article and thought it pointless at best. Yes, if you switch from PC to Mac you may have to get new / different software. What that constitutes news is beyond me.

    Beyond that, I use a desktop mail client. I believe all web mail clients suck (that includes gmail and Yahoo mail which are the ones I am most familiar with ).

    I'm no expert on the subject, but I thought there were some privacy concerns regarding gmail. If memory serves me the gist is that Google keeps copies of everything even if you delete it. The Communication Decency Act makes all e-mail "non-private" after 3 months. If push comes to shove, Google has a personal searchable, easily subpoena-able database on you

  7. Dan Skaggs

    I read that article a couple days ago and had to stop mid-way through because the crap he was spewing was severely ticking me off. Sounds to me like a MS flunky (albeit a highly-paid MS flunky if he's a VP) trying to make his OS look better by painting only a part of the picture of the competition. Our household ran across that line in the sand last year and I'm absolutely glad we did.

Comments are closed.