This is why Journalists suck

I’m writing this on my personal blog because it’s my view not Tom’s and not 360Conferences. (I really hate that disclaimer)

We just got back from a really successful 360|iDev, it rocked! iPhone developers are a really cool group of folks. I’ll be writing up my thoughts on the conference in another blog post, but wanted to rail on journalists for a second. I won’t lie, my irritation is self serving.

I wrote to TUAW and iLounge a good month and some change about our iPhone developer conference, no reply. No biggy, we were unknown, they could care less. Done.

Then we got an email from a reporter at the Wall Street Journal, asking for a press pass to 360|iDev. She was interested in talking to Jay Freeman about Cydia. We extended our warm welcome, hoping that as “Beat reporter for iPhone” an iPhone developer conference (first of it’s kind since O’Reilly pulled the plug), put on by developers would be interesting. Turns out no, that’s not an interesting story.

As far as we know the reporter never showed at the conference (We work the reg booth, we’d know).

Jay announced that the Cydia store was coming at 360|iDev, it’d be here Friday after the conference (3/6). What really irks me, is that TUAW, Engadget, iLounge, and the WSJ can’t be bothered to mention where the announcement was first made, just that it was made.

Don’t get me wrong, Jay is the rock star! I’m this much closer to jailbreaking because of his work. Like I said my annoyance is purely self serving, but it is part of the story. “At a developer conference in San Jose, Jay Freeman announced the imminent launch of the Cydia Store.”  Props to Jay, keep up the good work, making the iPhone better!

Update: Tom’s Guide at least got it.

11 thoughts on “This is why Journalists suck

  1. Tim

    First, let me say that not all journalists suck… coughcough.

    Second, those people are idiots. The "Who, what, when, where, how and why" is first day Intro to Journalism class stuff. This is just lazy journalism pure and simple. And the sad thing is that it's so common that people just think that's how things are done. If a student walked into the college newsroom with something like that I would first laugh at them, then maybe throw an AP Stylebook at them.

    If that happened at the newspaper I work for, someone would be on the layoffs list and pushed right to the top.

    The first thing an editor should say is "Go back and finish this story."

    Then again it IS the Wall Street Journal afterall.

  2. John Wilker Post author

    True True, and I made sure to not say "all" journalists suck :) I suppose "journalist" is probably the wrong term in general for most of those sites, despite what they'd like to think.

    I'm especially annoyed with WSJ, and the reporter definitely earned a "no thank you" for her paper at future events. I mean, why give you a free pass if you can't be bothered to show the tiniest bit of love for the location of the news. It's not worth it to us.

  3. Tim

    Yeah, people like that annoy me to no end. You are working at a big time publication, ACT LIKE IT!

    You should block them from now on. It's their loss, not yours.

    Don't give up on all journalists though, there are a few of us left that actually care about journalistic integrity and doing silly things like including facts.

  4. Jeremy Horwitz

    John, one of my editors e-mailed me this link, and I can tell you that I never received an e-mail from you regarding this. Please send me a quick e-mail at jeremy (at) iLounge.com and let me know where you sent your request for coverage, so that I can determine what happened — it's possible that your e-mail wasn't sent to the right address.

  5. John Wilker Post author

    Hey Jeremy, Thanks for chiming in! I forwarded the email i sent. I would hope if it went to the wrong addy, the recipient would forward to the right one?

  6. Tom

    You left out TechCrunch. I could be mistaken, but here's the situation as it went down. I'm at the Silicon Valley iPhone meetup (led by Tim Burks). I announce the show and it's incredibly low price. A shout from the audience, "Is there a TechCrunch discount?" To which I reply, "No, tickets are priced low already. There's not really room for discounts."

    Now, I thought the person was asking if there was a TechCrunch discount out there. However, after relating the story, many pointed out that the guy was likely from TechCrunch as was asking for a discount code so he could write about it.

    I have no way of knowing which was true, but I certainly hope that TechCrunch is not that low. With holding news that your customers could use simply because no discount was giving seems shady to me.

    However, I'm with you on the press front. People keep saying they're lazy and don't want to work for a story. You have to spoon feed them, etc. I just can't believe that. Maybe it's true though. I'd hope not, because if so, that's a sad statement on journalism as a practice.

  7. Tom

    You left out TechCrunch. I could be mistaken, but here's the situation as it went down. I'm at the Silicon Valley iPhone meetup (led by Tim Burks). I announce the show and it's incredibly low price. A shout from the audience, "Is there a TechCrunch discount?" To which I reply, "No, tickets are priced low already. There's not really room for discounts."

    Now, I thought the person was asking if there was a TechCrunch discount out there. However, after relating the story, many pointed out that the guy was likely from TechCrunch as was asking for a discount code so he could write about it.

    I have no way of knowing which was true, but I certainly hope that TechCrunch is not that low. With holding news that your customers could use simply because no discount was giving seems shady to me.

    However, I'm with you on the press front. People keep saying they're lazy and don't want to work for a story. You have to spoon feed them, etc. I just can't believe that. Maybe it's true though. I'd hope not, because if so, that's a sad statement on journalism as a practice.

  8. Tom

    You left out TechCrunch. I could be mistaken, but here's the situation as it went down. I'm at the Silicon Valley iPhone meetup (led by Tim Burks). I announce the show and it's incredibly low price. A shout from the audience, "Is there a TechCrunch discount?" To which I reply, "No, tickets are priced low already. There's not really room for discounts."

    Now, I thought the person was asking if there was a TechCrunch discount out there. However, after relating the story, many pointed out that the guy was likely from TechCrunch and was asking for a discount code so he could write about it.

    I have no way of knowing which was true, but I certainly hope that TechCrunch is not that low. With holding news that your customers could use simply because no discount was giving seems shady to me.

    However, I'm with you on the press front. People keep saying they're lazy and don't want to work for a story. You have to spoon feed them, etc. I just can't believe that. Maybe it's true though. I'd hope not, because if so, that's a sad statement on journalism as a practice.

    1. WordSmyth

      You have to spoon-feed them stuff because most journalists are not terribly well educated. Even big cities are paying reporters $35,000 a year. I can make more money being a local high school teacher. TV stations and newspapers ought to be hiring people with diverse technical and educational backgrounds to properly report on a beat. Instead, they don't, knowing that hiring someone with specialized knowledge in one area and specialized knowledge (and a competency) in journalism would be EXPENSIVE! The old model of journalism from the dawn of television until probably the year 2000 or 2005 was to schmooze someone into thinking they'd be super-awesome to have their stuff appear on a famous TV show. That line of thinking does not apply at all anymore, but television station and newspaper owners don't understand that, because they grew up when times were different.

Comments are closed.