Don’t lose sight of the forest

This is a two part criticism. It’s been rattling around in my head for a while but a recent email pushed it to the top so it was time to put it to paper.

Part 1. Me. When I plan events, a lot goes into them. A lot of what goes into it, is behind the scenes before i even announce the event. Without fail i launch the event and someone sends me a politely nasty email telling me why I’m the worst person on the planet because they can’t figure out something they want to know on the event site. That’s a huge fail on my part. Often it’s something I’ve known for months, but forget no one else has been privy to, which is easily fixed and apologized for. Sometimes it’s me being a dolt and forgetting to add the location to the details page, etc. Also easily fixed and apologized for. Sometimes it’s part 2. and there’s not much i can do. I have a motto along the lines of “Customer service is often telling someone to fuck off as politely as possible” that’s a super extreme motto, and most customer service for me, ISN’T that at all. But some is, and it’s usually because of Part 2.

Part 2. You. When you visit a site, and the first thing you do is start picking apart font choices, video production values, where pixels and shadow’s fall, how much or how little information is on the page, you’re doing it wrong. Yes every business should strive for perfection, should strive to answer every question before it’s asked, but see Part 1. If you’re so hung up on the tiny details that you fail to see the bigger picture, the deeper meaning, well it’s a good bet that the event, site, or product isn’t for you. And to be honest it’s your loss. I don’t want my event and by extension myself to look silly, but at the same time, we’re all human. mistakes and assumptions happen, and if you can’t get past that.. well. re-read the sentence two up from this.

 

That is. Let’s all agree to try harder on parts 1 and 2.