Tag Archives: Work

Ignite Denver Turned Twenty-Five

Last week we held another Ignite Denver, number 25. I hadn’t really given it much thought, we do three a year, the team is awesome and I love them immensely. This one was set to be every bit as awesome, we’d sold out, had great food trucks lined up, had great speakers ready to inspire and amaze.

Then.

Dan gets on stage and starts talking, and as I lean over to Vanessa, to ask why he’s vamping, and where’s Kat our emcee, I realize what he’s doing. This awesome group of people, behind my back, decided to bring me from the background to the fore.

Before I finish that story though. Ignite Denver is eight years old. In eight years we’ve held 25 events all around downtown Denver, from bars to event spaces to our current home, a 500 person old-timey theatre in the Highlands. The team has changed over the years; starting as just Nicole and I, then growing, then contracting over the years. This current committee is amazing and solid, and despite personality differences, busy (REALLY busy) lives, we get together and pull off an amazing show that leaves the audience laughing, crying, and inspired. They’re also stuffed with good food and beer.

We started in a small side bar at Fado, where the most memorable part was a robot falling off the bar. From there we hopped from bar to bar to event space, to bar. We landed at the Oriental a few years ago, when it was still more creepy than not; sections of the ceiling falling in, HVAC failing the day of our summer show, etc. The theatre has grown with us, now booked more nights than not, and Ignite Denver either sells out or gets close every event now.

Being a part of the Denver Community all these years has been awesome! Meeting so many amazing people with things to share, has been inspiring.

It’s been amazing, and more than once I’ve thought about throwing in the towel.

Ignite Denver 25

Ignite Denver WhiskeyOk back to the story, so Dan is talking about me, and telling me I have to go on stage. I get up on stage, and Dan proceeds to talk about Ignite Denver’s start, and the changes over the years, and the consistency of me. Then gives me two really amazing gifts, from him and the rest of the committee.

I’m not a whiskey drinker (that’s what that is right?) But it will definitely sit on a shelf proudly, because that label!

Also two special, “never to be made again” shirts :) We just ordered a new run of shirts for the team, and apparently we slipped these in.

To say I was (and still am) touched is to put it lightly. Ignite Denver has been a labor of love since I sent the first “Wanna do a talk that’s five minutes and the slides advance automatically?” emails eight years ago.

Here’s to 25 more!

Jarvis Standing Desk Review

I’ve had a standing desk for a while now, I have had one at Uncubed for years, but when Nicole and I decided to redo our home office (we both primarily work from home) I wanted us both to get standing desks.  In the way back it was easy, Geek Desk was more or less the only/main game in town.

Now however, there’s no shortage of options, and opinions :)

As we do now, I started by asking around on Twitter and Facebook. Many chimed in with what they use, or what they’re looking at for themselves. Rarely did anyone recommend the same thing as anyone else, until (IIRC) two people mentioned the Jarvis.

Then someone pointed me to this awesome blog post. Which quite literally saved me a good couple weeks, by doing most of the research I would’ve done. Dave’s post is immensely thorough. The only thing missing was IKEA’s entry into the game, which didn’t matter as it was out of the running for me, based on the size of the table top.

Fitting one standing desk in a home office is easy, two adds some complexity. Table top size, how close we’d want our desks (if they were going to be side by side), etc. is a big deal, as is leaving enough room after two desks are in it, for us and our dogs, and the various other things that go in the office.

After reading Dave’s post, and knowing my experiences with Geekdesks at my office (which I liked, but were still a pretty hefty price, and basic), we went with the Jarvis. The Bamboo top has actually been a Wirecutter favorite for several years, and ranked high in Dave’s own research. We didn’t get the bamboo because neither of us like wood grain as a look.

Jarvis basic desk controlsThe nice thing with Ergodepot (now Fully) is that you pick and choose what you want, including grommet placement. Nicole wanted a grommet in one place, I opted for another, so it was nice neither of us was getting a one size fits all standing desk. Beyond that you can choose from regular controls or the fancier memory ones, can add all manner of things to the desk. We went pretty bare bones.

One thing I like a lot, is that the controls (Up/Down) are lit. and the control is slightly angled. It’s just more visually appealing than geek desk controls.

For those interested, specifically we got for our standing desks:

My Jarvis standing deskJarvis 48″ x 30″ rectangle graphite top, black frame.

Grommet in the center for me, left corner for her (looks like that’s no longer an option which likely addresses my one CON). Now you can choose two grommets (left and right corner) or no grommets.

I already had some extra IKEA under desk stuff holders, so opted to not get the cable management option. Ditto pencil trays, lamps, etc.

Standard up/down switch. Memory seems nice, but it’s not that hard to do, so….

The one thing that drove me a bit batty, was the wait. I’m just not that patient when ordering things (Thanks Amazon). From order to ship, the frame was the next day, the table top was a week later, via UPS ground, which added another week. The delay likely due to the (no longer an option) grommet placement.

 

If I were in the market right now for a standing desk, I’d buy a Jarvis in a heartbeat. Nicole and I both love ours.

What do you use to track your time?

The first draft of this post was lamenting the changes to and my leaving of Hours. Except that’s premature, as I’m still using it. So I’ve re-written this as an open question to anyone who reads this. What do you use to track your time? Below are my criteria, and a few apps I’ve tried.

First and foremost. I don’t bill for my time, but track it so I can keep in the know on who much time I spend on projects, whether my own events, or client projects. Billing is a non issue.

Sync. Also a non issue. While it’d be handy to manage timers anywhere, the main device has always been my iPhone. So long as the app is mobile, I’m good. A Mac and/or iPad app are cool, but not required.

Reports. This is a big(ish) one. Hours really excelled at it’s reporting. Past tense. Now the free reports are pretty much shit, and based on updates and losses of data, I’m not willing to pay $8/mo. for reports. (there’s other things that $8 covers, see above as to why I don’t care). I want to be able to generate per client/project and over all reports. I’d love to see a high level annual report, or monthly or weekly reports, or what I spent time on. Exporting a PDF is idea..

 

I’ve looked at a few already.

Harvest is one of the most suggested. It’s very much aimed at tracking your time for the purpose of billing. Their pricing is evidence of that. I’ve no issue paying for software, however Harvest isn’t priced for someone in my (unique?) situation.

Harvest would be perfect if there was a level between free and $12/month. I (I assume I’m not the only one) don’t need more users, I don’t need any invoicing, and honestly unlimited clients is much, likewise unlimited projects. I assume they’ve looked into it, but for me going from 2 projects to unlimited is a big step and there’s a space in the middle for users like me.

I’ve looked at Toggl, which also has a ton of potential and is quite close to what I want. Except the UI is atrocious. Like confusing and sluggish on top of not overly attractive. Hours was simple and clean, which makes doing the thing it does great. Nothing gets in the way. I tried Toggl a few months ago, running concurrently with Hours. Hated it. The Mac app was nice, the syncing sucked. I’d start a timer, but it wouldn’t show up on my iPhone. I know sync is hard, and am happy without it. I might try Toggl again just on my phone and see what I think. I might have been too easily lured into the bells and whistles.

 

I’ve looks at Tsheets, which seems to need a login, so I’m guessing isn’t made for one offs, but larger things? Or just has a crappy on boarding experience.

I looked Chronomate, but it’s more aimed at tying into invoicing, which isn’t valuable to me.

I haven’t looked at it yet but OfficeTime might be promising, will see.

What’re you using/suggest?

 

Gratitude

IMG_2478Saying “Thank you” is important. If nothing else it’s polite, but for events, it’s important to realize, you’re the least important piece of the pie.

No one is buying a ticket to hang out with you. They’re coming to see the speakers, possibly to meet sponsors (especially if they’re looking for work). If you factor in at all, it’s a distant third.

For every event I organize I hand write thank you cards. Every speaker gets one (barring hiccups in the process, etc) when they check into the hotel or when they arrive at the conference.

For 360|iDev that’s almost 60 cards. For 360|AnDev is was just under 30.

I think too many event organizers forget that it’s not about them, they form a cult of personality around them as if their presence is the key. Sure great organizers do great events, but the ‘great’  part is the event, not the organizer.

 

I’ve thought about using something to automate my thank you cards, but realized that’s not what I’m about. Sure some have words crossed out, because my hand moved faster than my brain, sure I sometimes write them upside down, or misspell a word, but that’s what authenticity looks like.

Conference Signage V3

IMG_2523So I wrote a while back about Conference signage, and what my “version 1” looked like, and where I wanted to see version 2 come in.

Turns out V2 came sooner than expected. The awesome team at Essemble, who built the conference app, were able to quickly work up. rough version 1 of a conference signage AppleTV app.

It wasn’t fancy to start, I have a few things I’d like to change for next year, but overall it was awesome. Of course training people to look at this vs. the crappy little monitors hotels install outside conference rooms might be a bigger challenge than I expected.

IMG_2542Each room had a large monitor out front, and an AppleTV. The app had a list of rooms, you selected the room the TV was in front of and that was it. The app polled the server that drives the conference app, so any changes I made to the schedule in the app, were reflected almost immediately on the screens. Certainly faster than I could update the website.

 

As a first cut of this, done in … I think 2-3 weeks at most, I’m thrilled. The information I wanted to present was presented. I didn’t have to print out session signs for every session in every room, and have volunteers running around to change them. I was able to quickly move sessions based on capacity, and everything I needed to reflect those changes, did so quickly.

IMG_2540There were a few hang ups, the way the app pulled data left the previous evenings listing until 15 minutes before the next mornings event, vs. starting wth the first thing that day. Not a big deal, and easily addressed.

I loved that general sessions were able to be called out as basically “Not in this room” so anyone walking in, not only knew it was a general session, but where it was, and that it wasn’t in the room they were standing at.

I’d love to have them run in portrait, mostly because hotels don’t have small screens, and nearly 50″ is a lot to have sitting there in landscape. Not a deal breaker.

I’d love to have a bit more styling on the display, maybe using the header image for the event along the top, or as a full background, again not a deal breaker.

Down the road, a bit down the road, I’d like to own my own displays (probably smaller, 46″ was nice, but I felt it was a bit overkill) so I have more control on size, and placement, etc. but even using hotel kit, it worked out great.

I’d love to make conference signage more valuable and realistically more trustworthy for attendees. Hotels have small monitors that they use, but those changes aren’t in my control, they’re scraped from the schedule and any changes require emails to be sent, delay, etc. Updating the website is something I do as we go, but it’s also not as fast as simply changing the data the app uses, and not just updating the app, but the room signs at the some time.

Bushel to the Rescue!

So I heard about Bushel on a podcast i was interviewed for. I fell in love.

I’ve had a long standing family rule, use the devices I tell you to, and you get support, use something else, and you’re on your own. My mom until recently was a PC user, she was hella on her own!

Then she got a macbook air. I have lots… and I mean LOTS of macs. The conferences have 4 for session recording, i have mine. I have 2 mac mini’s, various iOS devices, my wife has a Macbook Pro and iOs devices, etc.

Work and family devices, managedI can now manage them all. No more “Gah, you have 3,542 updates waiting” or “Why don’t you do X?”

Between bushel and Screens (i just the other day remotely helped my mom, not by trying to understand what she was seeing on the screen, but by seeing the screen directly.) I can make sure everyone uses strong passwords, disk encryption, and more.

What’s nice, I can establish different schemes (called blueprints in Bushel), so i have work computers managed one way, family machines managed another. This is especially awesome since work machines can all have the same settings, and this let’s me manage that much easier than touching each one.

Setup is easy, you toggle on “open enrollment” go to a website on the device, install the certs, done. (Well done on the client, you have to do some Apple stuff as far as management certs, approval, etc. But just once)

What’s nice, you can use it for free for the first few devices. See if you like it. If you do sign up, use this link.

 

Conference lunches…. They don’t have to suck

Conference food… There’s typically two types of conference food;

“Oh my god, this conference has really good food” and,

“Let’s just go somewhere else (and spend our own money), this event has crappy food”

More often than not 360|iDev (and 360|Flex in it’s day) were usually the former. I’ve always thought that conference food shouldn’t be gross, it shouldn’t be rubbery chicken, and steamed veggies. It should be something that people go back for seconds for, it should be something people actually talk about, as much a valued part of the event as the content. I’ve mostly been successful at that.

That’s not to say I’m batting 1000 (I think i used that reference right), there are times when the meal fails to deliver, either i picked poorly, or the venue wasn’t up to the task.

The last two years I’ve taken my approach to conference lunch a step further, offering something few events offer; choice.

While having everyone eat lunch in the conference space has value, I think it’s more valuable to get attendees outdoors. For a few reasons, in no particular order;

  1. Attendees have more choice in what they eat, which is either impossible or stupid expensive within the conference center.
  2. They can meet new people by ending up at the same place as others, but not so many that it’s daunting.
  3. They get to enjoy what the host city has to offer
  4. I get to support local businesses, which is a huge part of my business. 360|Conferences is a Denver, CO company and whenever I can I want to support other Colorado businesses.

 

It’s easy to do an event, it’s harder to do events that don’t suck.